Projects

One Room at a Time

Aug 7, 2009 by Hiromi Ogawa

We've been looking forward to telling you about our new service, One Room at a Time, but it's been a super busy summer (which is a good thing!) and so, here's a summary of what we want you to know.

One Room at a Time is a turn-key, fast-track, design-build service where we transform a room (or two) for instant gratification.  We have teamed up with a great builder to provide a one stop shop for you to get your project done quickly and easily.  The response has been great, especially since we establish a hard cap on the budget, and then work backwards from there; we're only doing as much as you can afford, not a penny more.

kitchen - before

kitchen - before

You know what I'm talking about - that bonus room you've wanted, the kitchen that needs a facelift, an unfinished basement or attic with so much potential.  And you keep hoping that you'll have time next weekend to work on it, right?  Maybe you think the project is too small or the budget too tight for a builder, much less an architect?

kitchen - after

kitchen - after

Well, let me tell you a little bit about our approach.  My lifelong motto for practicing architecture has been to make the world a beautiful place, one room at a time.  I feel it is my responsibility as an architect to ensure that everyone has access to good design expertise.  Small decisions (what paint color?  Which window manufacturer?  Where to go to buy a light fixture?) add up to define the quality of your space.  We've been shopping around, accumulating a resource library, drawing details, refining room layouts for our entire design career, so that we can help you with those decisions.  In order to make our services more user-friendly, and make the whole process easier to approach, we decided to package our services with a dedicated contractor.  You establish the budget, and we help you streamline design and construction, every step of the way.  The projects are small enough that we can go from our first design meeting to move-in ready in a few weeks.  We meet, we draw, we build, and PRESTO!  You are done!

bathroom - before

bathroom - before

The recession may have put your bigger dreams on hold, but that just means you need a little sanctuary in your house - a room you love - now more than ever, to escape the gloomy economy, and the colder months ahead.  Your quality of life could greatly improve by having one beautiful room in your house for you and your family, a place where you can (finally!) entertain your friends and be yourself.

bathroom - after

bathroom - after

It only sounds like a sales pitch because I am not very eloquent at telling you how much I believe in spreading good design.  Good architecture is for everyone.  And we want you to have it, one room at a time.

Topics: Projects

Top 7 list for designing your perfect home

Oct 29, 2008 by Hiromi Ogawa

This is an outline to a talk I have given in the past.  I think it's important for everyone to be well-informed, so I hope you find this list to be useful when approaching your next wonderfully dreamy idea.

Living the Dream: an insider’s guide to designing and building your perfect home.

1.    Philosophy.  Most importantly, you’re trying to make your surroundings into a reflection of who you are.  Consider forming a “mission statement” of sorts, aside from the wish list, which explains who you are, what you enjoy, and how you want that to be reflected in your environment.

2.    Wishlist.  Here’s where you list everything you’ve ever wanted to do, even if you don’t think it applies to design or to your immediate future.  The more comprehensive the list, the better the design.

  • a.     Scope of work – divide the list between needs and wants
  • b.    Budget – include a 15% buffer for contingency
  • c.    Schedule – when do you want to start or finish construction?

3.    Your team.  Mainly, you need an architect and a contractor.  If you have a particular architect or contractor in mind, have them help you find the other.  You want to make sure that everyone on your team works well together.

4.    Logistics – your architect can help you determine the parameters for your project.

  • a.    Property information
  • b.    Planning code
  • c.    Building code

5.    Design.  This is the fun part.  It’s also very intense.  Your architect will help you navigate through each phase of design, while keeping everything on schedule and on budget.  The goal is to get exactly what you want!

6.    Execution.  Your architect and contractor will be working with you through all phases.

  • a.    Design
  • b.    Building permit(s)
  • c.    Bidding/negotiation
  • d.    Construction

7.    Maintenance.  With a new environment comes a commitment to a new lifestyle.
It’s a long process of design and construction, so make sure you have fun during the process.  With the right support (this includes your architect, contractor, colleagues, and family members) it will be smooth and enjoyable.

old shadows

Sep 17, 2008 by Hiromi Ogawa

I love demolition.  You see layers of the past right before your eyes.

Demolition has started in a kitchen in Portland, OR and the space, devoid of cabinets and color, is just gorgeous.

p91712331Here's an old built-in ironing board nook (which was buried beneath sheet rock and layers of wall paper and paint), and you can even see where the ironing board used to be.

And the back side of old lath and plaster looks like icing layers on a cake.

p91712391

New photos from our favorite photographer

Mar 27, 2008 by Hiromi Ogawa

It's always a pure joy to work with Joe Fletcher.

Here is one of the photos he took for two houses we designed in California.

6281.jpg

Topics: Projects

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